Our environment has been significantly altered. We live with nature at arm’s length.

 - Robert Adams

I became a photographer because of the medium’s power to reveal—metaphorically and literally. My earliest memories of the darkroom are of those exhilarating moments when an image first floats into view, slowly revealing its mystery. This liminal space of emergence, between obscurity and exposure, is at the heart of my work as a visual artist.

 

Limen/Lumen

“In anthropology, liminality (from the Latin word līmen, meaning ‘a threshold’ is the quality of ambiguity or disorientation that occurs in the middle stage of rituals when participants no longer hold their pre-ritual status but have not yet begun the transition to the status they will hold when the ritual is complete. During a ritual's liminal stage, participants "stand at the threshold” between their previous way of structuring their identity, time, or community, and a new way, which the ritual establishes.”

 

These images were made during residencies at Hewnoaks Artist Colony, Hambidge Center and Penland. I became interested in standing at the threshold- the space in between the interior and the exterior. These images investigate place as it’s tied to memory and longing, and our emotional, physical and intellectual relationship with the landscape. They are the waiting areas between one point in time and space and the next.

Lumen Love

Lumen Love was created during the pandemic. I sought solace in the natural world where poetry, light, and growth were evident in the forest near my house. I was interested in pushing the medium and materials as a way to see the future. These Antholumen photograms were created with expired silver gelatin exposed to the sun and coated with a mix of natural plant materials as a way to alter the color and explore alchemy.    

 

I became a photographer because of the medium’s power to reveal—metaphorically and literally. My earliest memories of the darkroom are of those exhilarating moments when an image first floats into view, slowly revealing its mystery. This liminal space of emergence, between obscurity and exposure, is at the heart of my work as a visual artist. My projects organize themselves around hidden troves. I am drawn to museum collections, science, and natural history specimens, material objects, social units—assembled contents that have been neglected or forgotten, erased by anonymity, by time, by death, by darkness. In quiet contemplation, I touch, rearrange, and photograph these objects as I consider their archaeological value and explore new ways to bring them into the light.